Chrysis scutellaris ovipositor length

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Chrysis scutellaris ovipositor length

Postby Alex » 27 Jul 2011 02:16

I did not know that the ovipositors of some Chrysis species could be this long, and agile until I caught what in Sweden is a very rare and endangered species: Chrysis scutellaris :wohow:

At one point the tip of the ovipositor was touching the back of her head, maybe she was scratching her head trying to figure out what was happening :? .

On a more serious note, I guess she was trying to sting me, or fake a sting, it was amazing how agile the ovipositor was, she could bend it in any direction. It behaved very much like a tentacle of some sort.

(Bad) picture below


Just thought I'd share my observation
/Alex
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Re: Chrysis scutellaris ovipositor length

Postby Euchroeus » 30 Jul 2011 18:08

Hi Alex,

great finding in Sweden!!! :D
I know that it is a rare species there!


The ovopositor is very long yes! There are some species with a longer ovopositor as well: i.e. Chrysis subsinuata.
When you open all the internal sternites and tergites you need more labels to glue them :wow:

Thanks for your interesting observation :thanks:

Ciao
Paolo
Paolo Rosa - www.chrysis.net
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Re: Chrysis scutellaris ovipositor length

Postby Alex » 03 Aug 2011 14:47

I was there again to days ago, and saw atleast one of the two females from last time. I was trying to find out which species it uses as host in Sweden. I dont think it is known, I checked your database and the two listed host species do not occur in Sweden:
Halictus maculatus
Eumenes pomiformis

Do you have any hunch of what host it might have? Someone I talked to over the internet mentioned Megachile dorsalis?
C. scutellaris is found only on a hot, sandy place in Sweden, a place with many other rare Hymenopterans. I saw one female C. scutellaris crawl down a hole at the base of a small tuft of grass (Corynephorus canescens ), and she was there for some time, so I guess she could have oviposited? The whole was going into the ground at a shallow angle, from what could be seen. I waited at the hole for an hour or so, but the owner did not come back :/

I also noted one female completely burrowing herself into the sandy ground, it took several minutes for her, unfortunately I went for my camera and when I got back I couldnt find the spot again :doh:

/Alex
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